MAURO GILIOLI

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http://www.celesteprize.com/artwork/ido:78668/

requiescat in pace: May he rest in peace.

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Vandyke Brown Silver-sun prints

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Vandyke brown silver-sun prints on Torinoko Gampi 

We are each born at a certain instant from a seed and just as sure as the solar and lunar systems cycle around us, we inherit our ancestral lineage–the blueprint / membrane of our own being.

From the soil of our planet earth, we are given the potential to engage our human spirit in the endeavor of coming to understand our evolutionary bodies. 
Transcribed by sunlight, these vandyke brown silver-sun prints are made by enlarging skeletal leaves onto film. These negatives are then contact printed to hand coated , solar sensitive tissue weight Japanese papers.

Anna Atkins

http://www.renewest.net/blog/2010/1/18/anna-atkins-botanist-and-photographer….

Tzu-Chi Yeh 葉子奇

Tzu-Chi Yeh 葉子奇 - Typhoon Approaching. Oil over tempera on linen, 200x300 cm (2007-09)
Typhoon Approaching. Oil over tempera on linen, 200×300 cm (2007-09)

 

Remembering my Grandad

Its been a bit of a shock to be honest finding out about my grandad.  I am not saying that he isn’t capable or anything like that, its just that it is such a notorious piece of history el Alamein and finding out you had a family member serving there it brings back memories of him, some sad and many happy!

He was funny and he always had a bet on the horses, most Saturdays & Sundays (it was only next door!!) I have a bet on for him when its the Grand National, I think that is probably the one race that he put a bet on for me (and maybe a few sneaky bets when mum and dad weren’t around!!)

I remember him in the sitting room, a two-up-and-two down terrace. He always had his chair by the fire with the tv on in front of him, with his newspaper.  (the newsagents was next door too!)

I remember him telling me about the wound he had to his shoulder.

The Family Puzzle and two World Wars

My grandad fought in World War 2, 7th Battalion, Black Watch, 8th Army, El Alamein (Desert Rats), Noth Africa, then Italy.  I also remember being told that my uncle fought in Burma.  At the moment I am researching the battle of el Alamein and when I have the information, I will carry on with my research into Burma.  I am just trying to put the pieces of the puzzle together, which, so far, has been really interesting.  I have included the following detail from the web, as I want to provide some background information.

The North African Campaign

On 10th June 1940, Italy declared war against Britain and France. Italy controlled Libya. The British controlled Egypt and the vital Suez Canal. The Canal allowed ships to sail more quickly from Europe to India. In World War Two a new front was opened in North Africa.

On 14th June 1940, British units crossed the border into Libya and captured the Italian Fort Capuzzo. Italian General Graziani then mounted an offensive into Egypt but was stopped at Sidi Barrani. In December 1940, General Wavell led a Commonwealth counter offensive, called Operation Compass. The Italian 10th Army was destroyed. The British 8th Army advanced rapidly through Tobruk to Benghazi and El Agheilar, halfway to Tripoli.

Adolf Hitler, the German Fuehrer, dispatched the German Afrikakorps to North Africa. It was commanded by Lieutenant General Erwin Rommel. He was to bolster the Italian forces and prevent a complete defeat. The Allied Army was overstretched and was quickly rolled back. Tobruk was left as a fortress behind enemy lines. 

In November 1941 General Auchinleck led a second counter attack, relieving Tobruk and driving the Axis forces back to El Agheilar.

The success was short lived. In January 1942, General Rommel led his Axis forces in a counter attack which captured Tobruk and drove the Allies out of Libya. General Rommel pushed on 400 km east to El Alamein.

Rommel came to be nick named “The Desert Fox.” Promoted Field Marshall, he threatened Alexandria and the Suez Canal and Cairo were on the verge of falling to the Germans.

The new Allied commander was Lieutenant General Bernard Montgomery. He began, patiently, to build up his Allied and Commonwealth forces in the desert, west of Alexandria.

Map of the War in North Africa, 1940-42

Exhibition Image One

On 10th June 1940, Italy declared war against Britain and France. Italy controlled Libya. The British controlled Egypt and the vital Suez Canal. The Canal allowed ships to sail more quickly from Europe to India. In World War Two a new front was opened in North Africa.

On 14th June 1940, British units crossed the border into Libya and captured the Italian Fort Capuzzo. The Italian General Graziani then mounted an offensive into Egypt but was stopped at Sidi Barrani. In December 1940, General Wavell led a Commonwealth counter offensive, called Operation Compass. The Italian 10th Army was destroyed. The British 8th Army advanced rapidly through Tobruk to Benghazi and El Agheilar, halfway to Tripoli.

Adolf Hitler, the German Fuehrer, dispatched the German Afrikakorps to North Africa. It was commanded by Lieutenant General Erwin Rommel. He was to bolster the Italian forces and prevent a complete defeat. The Allied Army was overstretched and was quickly rolled back. Tobruk was left as a fortress behind enemy lines. 

In November 1941 General Auchinleck led a second counter attack, relieving Tobruk and driving the Axis forces back to El Agheilar.

The success was short lived. In January 1942, General Rommel led his Axis forces in a counter attack which captured Tobruk and drove the Allies out of Libya. General Rommel pushed on 400 km east to El Alamein.

Rommel came to be nick named “The Desert Fox.” Promoted Field Marshall, he threatened Alexandria and the Suez Canal and Cairo were on the verge of falling to the Germans.

The new Allied commander was Lieutenant General Bernard Montgomery. He began, patiently, to build up his Allied and Commonwealth forces in the desert, west of Alexandria.

The Battle of El Alamein, fought in October 1942, was the turning point for the Allies. General Montgomery drove General Rommel’s Afrikakorps and General Messe’s Italian divisions back into Libya. The Axis forces’ retreat became a rout and in January 1943 the Allies entered Tripoli.

Source

Date: 1940-42
Contributor: Australian Army
Location: Egypt, Libya
Original Source: Courtesy of the Australian Army

 

 

My Grandad World War Two – Desert Rats

I have recently discovered, (after some research into my family tree) that my grandad served in World War Two. I am very proud of him, and all the other men and women who fought and fight in wars of the past and present!!  

He didn’t talk much about his experiences in the war, I always wanted to know but I couldn’t find the right time, I don’t think there was one to be honest.  I remember when he allowed me to see his injury, which was from shrapnel.  His injury was a hole in the back of his shoulder.  I think I must have been messing around and saying in a light hearted way that I didn’t believe him! I couldn’t believe it!  I remember him telling me that his shoulder, arm and most of his chest was encased in plaster, for a long time, months which must have been awful.

My grandma and grandad lived on Stamford Street in Ashton.  When me and my sister stayed at our grandma and grandad’s house it was usually a Saturday, which was shopping day.  The town centre is a short walk into the centre.  I would walk down with grandad and my sister would travel on the bus with our grandma.  My grandad and me would walk down a straight but busy road, and we would walk through a garden/small park area where there was a memorial, which had the name of my grandma’s husband who died in the First World War, he was called Abraham Hare.  Some time later she married my grandad, Alfred Bakewell, affectionately known as ‘Alf’.

World_war_two_desert_rats

 

Image Central Manchester Library

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I have chosen this image because I have walked passed it lot in the past rain or shine, as I worked close by!  

 

Sylvia Plath (& Ted Hughes)

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Sylvia-plath

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Sylvia_plath

Kayan People (Padaung)

I have always been fascinated by the Women of Burma and Thailand wearing neck rings.  I found this beautiful photograph and wanted to share it.
This image reminds me of The Uncanny.

Long neck woman – Secret of neck ring

Kayan people, also known as Padaung, living in the mountains bordering Burma and Thailand. They are a Sino-Tibetan language speaking ethnic group. In Thailand they are all Burmese refugees. What makes the tribe unique is the characteristic neck rings worn by the women of the tribe.
There are different theories as to how the custom originated. One suggests men put the rings on their women to deter slave traders or some sources predict it as a protection from tiger-bite.
Kayan women might appear to have long necks but this is an optical illusion. As the coils are added they push the collar bone and ribs down, creating the appearance of a longer neck. Removing the coils does not cause a woman’s neck to collapse, although the muscles weaken.